How Many Keywords Are Too Many?

Let us suppose that you have a new website that you want to launch and you have a little knowledge of how Internet search engines work. You know that these keyword rich articles dramatically help to boost your search engine rankings. Search engine algorithms love keyword dense articles and this has been a proven strategy for some time now. Experienced website masters have been using these keyword rich articles for a long time.


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You decide to find the keywords that are most searched for, related to the topic of your website. You can easily find these lists on the search engine websites telling you what people have been searching for recently in a given area of interest. People have told you that article lengths can vary but to generally keep them under 1,200 words so that the readers do not get bored and feel like they are reading a book. So, now you have your list of the top 100 keywords that people are searching for in your topic area and you have decided how long you want the articles to be. Now you contact a writer to write these keyword rich articles for you. The writer will likely ask you what density you want to use on these articles. This is where it gets tricky!

The truth is that people are usually guessing as to what the best density is to use when writing keyword rich articles. However, most have agreed that keeping the densities in the neighborhood of 3-7% is about right. One thing that I have seen people try to do though is that since they came up with a list of 100 keywords they only want to pay to have 25 of them written. So they decide to cram keyword phrases into each article. An extreme case would be using 4 keyword phrases in a single article. If the article is 1,000 words long and each phrase is 2 words long we are looking at a total of 8 words. Now lets suppose that the density is 5% for each phrase. This means that each word of the phrases will be used 50 times each. 50 times 4 are 200 of the total words in a 1,000-word article. This is 20% of the article dedicated to keywords and only keywords. This may not sound like a lot, but when you see it in print you will realize that it is a very large amount of keywords. This put you from a 5% density to a 20% density by cramming extra keyword phrases into the article.

The end result is that you may get the keyword density you are looking for but at what price? The readability of such an article will be poor to say the least. Even the most experienced and well qualified writer will have difficulty getting that many keyword phrases into one article. A writer will be forced to put at least one keyword phrase in almost every sentence of the article in order to meet the density requirement.

The idea behind the keyword rich articles is to improve search engine rankings and to get people to go to your website and purchase your product or services. If the reader comes there and sees a poorly written article that is chock full of keywords and little information, the reader is likely to look elsewhere for the information that he or she was seeking. Just because you CAN put a bunch of keywords in an article does not mean that you SHOULD.

 

When I do searches on the Internet I steer away from obviously keyword heavy articles and towards articles that actually provide relevant information. There is a needed balance between the density of the keywords and the readability of the articles that you are having written for your website. If you are ranked #1 in the search engine rankings but no one visits your site because there is not valuable content on your website, then being ranked #1 is rather pointless.

Try not to get caught up in the formulas that people suggest for keyword densities and always keep in mind that these articles will ultimately be read by a human being who is searching for information. If you are able to provide that quality information, then the reader is more apt to purchase your product or services. Search engine rankings are very important, but they are not the cure all.

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